Sylvia Plath.


How do you even begin to write about how much a person you admire. That person who inspires and provokes your character subconsciously. Today I felt the need to write about my admiration of poet and novelist Sylvia Plath.
This all comes from the fact that today I learned that Kirsten Dunst is directing the new “The Bell Jar” movie. This both shocked,excited and worried me a little. I hope she does a good job of portraying this book as a movie. I hope they make the book, which is semi biographical a beautiful homage to her. Though one of the most influential writers of the 20th century, I haven’t physically met many non-booklovers who have heard her or ” The Bell Jar”. If this film hits the cinema I want it to beautifully honour and create interest in this woman not leave people feeling like they don’t want or need to learn about this woman or her books and poems. 
Born in Boston, Massachusetts on October 27th 1932 she studied at a number of colleges before moving to England to study and obtained a scholarship to Cambridge University and wrote articles for the student newspaper . At a party whilst studying she first met her husband to be, fellow poet Ted Hughes they married in 1952 and went on to have two children, Frieda and Nicholas. They divorced in 1962. In 1963, The Bell Jar was published a month before her death by suicide. It would take 9 years for this book to be published in the US. 


The Bell Jar is raw, it’s is honest and unapologetic. It’s themes, dark, taboo incredibly modern and relevant even now 53 years later. The Bell Jar tells the story of young Ester Greenwood and her determination to not live the life expected of her. It follows her coming of age experiences with a rawness and her harrowing decent into mental illness. 
The book itself mirrors Plath’s life, In many parts. It’s a story written from experience. She struggled from a very young age with sadness and depression. Her Poem’s – published posthumously, Ariel also speaks about these struggles. 
What I admire about this woman is just how outspoken and honest she was about her struggles, in a time that mentioning such things would be taboo. She broke her way into a predominantly male role. Her death being so early, makes me sad that we never got to see any other novels, never read more prose and poems. I wish she lived to become the acclaimed writer she deserved to be. It makes me sad that people know her as that one who killed herself. She was so much more than that. 

How do you even begin to write about how much a person you admire. That person who inspires and provokes your character subconsciously. Today I felt the need to write about my admiration of poet and novelist Sylvia Plath.
This all comes from the fact that today I learned that Kirsten Dunst is directing the new “The Bell Jar” movie. This both shocked,excited and worried me a little. I hope she does a good job of portraying this book as a movie. I hope they make the book, which is semi biographical a beautiful homage to her. Though one of the most influential writers of the 20th century, I haven’t physically met many non-booklovers who have heard her or ” The Bell Jar”. If this film hits the cinema I want it to beautifully honour and create interest in this woman not leave people feeling like they don’t want or need to learn about this woman or her books and poems. 
Born in Boston, Massachusetts on October 27th 1932 she studied at a number of colleges before moving to England to study and obtained a scholarship to Cambridge University and wrote articles for the student newspaper . At a party whilst studying she first met her husband to be, fellow poet Ted Hughes they married in 1952 and went on to have two children, Frieda and Nicholas. They divorced in 1962. In 1963, The Bell Jar was published a month before her death by suicide. It would take 9 years for this book to be published in the US. 
The Bell Jar is raw, it’s is honest and unapologetic. It’s themes, dark, taboo incredibly modern and relevant even now 53 years later. The Bell Jar tells the story of young Ester Greenwood and her determination to not live the life expected of her. It follows her coming of age experiences with a rawness and her harrowing decent into mental illness. 
The book itself mirrors Plath’s life, In many parts. It’s a story written from experience. She struggled from a very young age with sadness and depression. Her Poem’s – published posthumously, Ariel also speaks about these struggles. 
What I admire about this woman is just how outspoken and honest she was about her struggles, in a time that mentioning such things would be taboo. She broke her way into a predominantly male role. Her death being so early, makes me sad that we never got to see any other novels, never read more prose and poems. I wish she lived to become the acclaimed writer she deserved to be. It makes me sad that people know her as that one who killed herself. She was so much more than that. 
I have a tattoo in homage of this remarkable woman, for all to see on my wrist. I always get asked what it is and where the words come from. If telling people about her and encouraging them look her up makes even one person read her book. I will be happy. She inspires me to be honest about my battles, not hide them. She inspires me to push boundaries and not be ashamed of who I am. She inspires me to not make the same mistake and keep on fighting. 

“I took at deep breath and listened to the old bray of my heart. I am, I am, I am.”
I have a tattoo in homage of this remarkable woman, for all to see on my wrist. I always get asked what it is and where the words come from. If telling people about her and encouraging them look her up makes even one person read her book. I will be happy. I also get asked if I have a thistle because I’m Scottish… I’m not, it’s a drawing of hers haha! 

“I took at deep breath and listened to the old bray of my heart. I am, I am, I am.”
You can purchase The Bell Jar here… and  Ariel… here

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